Papua New Guinea (City)

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Papua New Guinea (City)

from 3.00

Origin - Papua New Guinea

Location at Origin - Goroka

Grade - A

Processing - Washed

Altitude - 500-700m

Cupping notes: Mellow and sweet yet full with low acidity

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The staging of the Goroka Show started back in 1957 at the Independence Park opposite the Goroka Main Market. It was first introduced and organized by Australian Kiaps. Kiaps from each district built round houses typical of thier districts. It is they proudly displayed cultures of their districts. The kiaps brought in singsing groups from their area and as we have some twenty nine languages and societies it was reflected in their culture.

These days the Goroka show is partly a tourist event, but it's a rare opportunity for travellers to experience the customs of over a hundred tribes that populate the Papua New Guinea highlands. During the course of the weekend the tribes gather for music, dancing, showing-off and extraordinary displays of tribal rituals.

With a history of gold mines and coffee plantations, Eastern Highlands has had more exposure to European influence than any other Highlands provinces. It has a history full of colourful characters- miners, missionaries, patrol officers, plantation owners. Traditional dress is seldom worn this days, although the Highlanders still live in village of neat clusters of low walled round huts built amongst the rolling kunai-grass covered hills.

Goroka, a small outpost station in the 1950's has developed into an attractive, well organised town with modern facilities and relaxed atmosphere. It is a major Highlands commercial centre of 25,000 people at an altitude of 1600 metres. It has a climate of perpetual spring.

Today Goroka has become known for its annual show, held every September. It is a marvellous opportunity to gain an overview of PNG cultural diversity. The shows were first held in the 50's as a means of gathering together the different tribes and clans. At times there could be more than 40,000 painted warriors dancing to the beat of the Kundu drums. The scenario was an amazing success and grew from its original concept of a local get- together into a major tourist attraction.

Amongst the performers are the legendary mud men of Asaro. Tribal folklore records that centuries ago the warriors of Asaro were defeated in a tribal fight "payback" raid, and, to make themselves look fierce in the process, covered their bodies with grey mud. According to legend, the ruse worked. Their enemies fled at the sight of these ghostly apparitions. The mud men recreated the drama at the Goroka show and for hotel tour groups.